Sacroiliac Joint Injections

What Are Sacroiliac Joint Injection?

A sacroiliac joint injection is an injection of local anesthetic and a steroid medication into the sacroiliac joint. Due to the numbing medicine used during this procedure, you may experience temporary pain relief afterwards that may last several hours. Once the numbing medicine wears off, however, your pain will most likely return. The steroid medication may give longer lasting pain relief and usually begins working after 24-48 hours.

Patient is placed lying on their stomach. The injection site is cleansed with an antiseptic soap and alcohol, and then covered by sterile drapes. The skin is numbed with local anesthetic. Using Fluoroscopic guidance, a needle is advanced into the sacroiliac joint. X-ray dye will be injected to confirm proper placement. Local anesthetic and steroid are then injected into the joint, and the needle is removed.

Risks related to this procedure tend to be relatively minor and occur infrequently. Typical risks include:

  • Risks related to the medications used in the injection, such as a possible allergic reaction to a medication.
  • Bruising and/or soreness at the injection site.
  • Infection at the injection site, deeper tissues, or in the joint.